North Florida Scalloping (July-September)
North Florida Scalloping (July-September)
North Florida Scalloping (July-September)
North Florida Scalloping (July-September)
North Florida Scalloping (July-September)
North Florida Scalloping (July-September)
North Florida Scalloping (July-September)
North Florida Scalloping (July-September)
North Florida Scalloping (July-September)
North Florida Scalloping (July-September)
North Florida Scalloping (July-September)

North Florida Scalloping (July-September)

Regular price
$650.00
Sale price
$650.00
Unit price
per 

Scalloping Charter (3/4 day): $650

  • Guide: Capt. Brice Williamson - Blackjack 224
  • Guide: Capt. Chris Williamson - Pathfinder 2500
  • Franklin & Wakulla Counties July 1-September 24
  • Gulf County (Port St Joe) August 16-September 24
  • 6 person max
  • 6 hour inshore scalloping charter
  •  Guide will clean your scallops for additional $20/gallon
  • Includes fishing license, dive masks w/ snorkels, flippers, gloves, & nets
  • Everyone participating must sign our Liability Waiver
  • USCG Licensed Captain & Guide
  • Daily Bag Limit Per person: 2 gallons of whole bay scallops in shell or 1 pint of bay scallop meat
  • Daily Bag Limit Per Vessel: Maximum of 10 gallons of whole bay scallops in shell or 1/2 gallon bay scallop meat (1/2 gallon = 4 pints)
  • Lodging available at our Eastpoint Lodge: lodge can accommodate up to 11 people, call or text Capt. Chris for booking info 850-251-8650
  • note: Williamson Outfitters also accepts payments thru Venmo, search @Capt-Chris-Williamson

What you should bring:

  • Drinks & Food
  • Cooler for your catch
  • Dive masks, snorkels, & flippers will be provided, however feel free to bring your own dive gear if you like
  • Sunscreen & Sunglasses 
  • Dramamine if needed, however we will never be more than 5 miles from shore

Bay scallops are one of Florida’s most beloved delicacies. Along with stone crabs, rock shrimp, Caribbean lobsters, and grouper, bay scallops are a treat that Florida residents and visitors can harvest on their own and then take home to cook and enjoy.

Bay scallops are smaller than the sea scallops that you see at some of the finer seafood restaurants, and they’re also distinct in color (usually found either in light beige or pink color vs. the traditional white hue of a sea scallop). Once cooked, their flesh is sweeter and more tender than their larger cousins from the sea.

Compared with oysters and clams, scallop shells are lightweight to aid in swimming. Scallops swim by quickly opening and closing their shells, propelling themselves forward. And because a scallop can’t dig, its shell is forced to also act as camouflage. Worried about eating them? Scallops are one of the cleanest shellfish available. The abductor muscle is not used to filter water, so scallops are not susceptible to toxins or contaminants the way other shellfish often are.

Scalloping Tips

  • The best water depth is 4-8 feet.
  • Clear water is best with sea-grass beds; scallops are usually found in the grass or at the edges of sandy spots.
  • Once you see a scallop, dive down and grab it. Scallops will try to swim away but they aren’t very fast. They will also pinch you if you’re not careful – just grab them and quickly put them in your mesh bag.
  • Sometimes it takes a few minutes for your eyes to adjust to the light underwater but it won’t take long and you’ll be able to recognize the scallops.
  • Once you’re back on the boat, place scallops in a live well in the boat or a cooler with the scallops on top of the ice. They will die quickly if they get warm or if freshwater gets in their shells. The ice will also make them easier to open because the muscle that holds the shells together relaxes.
Our experienced guides with be with you every step of the way to ensure that you have a safe & memorable experience! Our boats are equipped with necessary USCG safety gear... our number one goal is to keep you safe!